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Old 01-09-2011, 01:55 PM   #1
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beginner's guide to classical music

alright lets do this.

ive recently gotten into classical music and im moving through the well known music first to get my feet wet.

so if you're interested in arguing about contrapuntal differentiations between baroque composers maybe stick to the other thread... i want this thread to take off like the dubstep one did hopefully, with the more knowledgeable guiding people like me (a layperson). so i'll start by saying what i've enjoyed lately for other people to check out, and i welcome input.

i'll make a note and say that unlike brutal death metal, libraries generally have a wonderful stock of classical CDs and are able to interlibrary loan them. take advantage of that... at least in america. you don't want to hear a 192 rip of an orchestra when you can get a CD for free. plus unlike standard liner notes with lyrics, classical CDs have notes about the composer, the performance, etc. particularly if it's a reissue.

the way i go about finding classical is kind of unorthodox i think. i tend to find performers who i like and find what they play. i tend towards solo or small orchestra music - a solo piano is usually my favorite.

performers who i enjoy and collect:

pianists -
sviatoslav richter
vladimir horowtiz
leif ove andsnes
mitsuko uchida

cellists -
well, i really only like one so far but i LOVE his work. janos starker

guitarists -
i like segovia, williams and bream but i find classical guitar to be a little sterile. particularly segovia, i think hes kind of rote and not very expressive compared to a good pianist

cellists -
really obsessed with janos starker.

composers i like: SCHUMANN! grieg, liszt, saint saens, brahms, dowland (odd man out) and if i'm feeling fiesty i like stravinsky and dvorak.

my album suggestions:

maybe my favorite album:
the first cello concerto in A minor is just breathtaking on good speakers. far more emotional and rich than metal



wonderful solo piano schumann


this is my first classical album really - it has songs that are easily remembered, very catchy and dynamic. more like pop than like stodgy old classical!


post what you like and why! recommendations for me? for all beginning classical fans? do you like solo music or do you like full orchestral pieces? etc...
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Old 01-09-2011, 02:11 PM   #2
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I'm a fan of symphonies and requiems the most, simply because these are what emotionally grabs me the most, and I enjoy listening to longer pieces.

for newcomers :















and then some of :

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Old 01-09-2011, 02:18 PM   #3
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oh i forgot chopin! i love horowitz's favorite chopin
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Old 01-09-2011, 02:31 PM   #4
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stravinsky
probably my fav for some time now
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Old 01-09-2011, 02:49 PM   #5
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Schnittke and Schoenberg are my favorites. Xenakis is up there too
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:04 PM   #6
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of the 'harder' stuff, you may check some Penderecki's works for orchestra or choirs
I've recently come across Giacinto Scelsi and am completely overwhelmed by his works for orchestra

When it comes to Czech composers, besides Dvorak, Smetana or Janacek I would recommend you Bohuslav Martinu, a real jewel
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:07 PM   #7
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how about prettier music? nothing has topped the emotional power of schumann for me. any suggestions?
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:28 PM   #8
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I've been listening to a lot a medieval music lately:




Last edited by Acatalepsy; 01-09-2011 at 03:31 PM..
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:39 PM   #9
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so, so awesome.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:40 PM   #10
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oh, prettier music? I can think of Carl Nielsen but I don't listen to music for the "prettiness", so there it ends for me.
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Old 01-09-2011, 04:50 PM   #11
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Glad you decided to make it. Firstly Sam, you have to hear Chopin's Ballade no. 1 in G minor.



Without a doubt one of my favorite Chopin pieces that I've heard so far. It's not even funny how ahead of his time he was.

I'll have to visit this thread quite often because there's no way I can include everything I'd like in one post. Sticking with solo guitar for the most part right now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Transient View Post
guitarists -
i like segovia, williams and bream but i find classical guitar to be a little sterile. particularly segovia, i think hes kind of rote and not very expressive compared to a good pianist
I'd recommend you check out Leo Brouwer, Heitor Villa-Lobos, Ricardo Cobo, Jorge Caballero, Ana Vidovic, Andrea Dieci, Fabio Zanon, Franz Halasz, Nemanja Ostoich, and Adam Holzman. As for classical guitar composers, Takemitsu and Brouwer are my favorites. Fans of Darmstadt, Cage, Penderecki, Ligeti, and Stockhausen should find something to love in Brouwers avant-garde works.

I'm not going to bother posting all the movements for this one. Just search youtube for the rest.

Leo Brouwer - Concerto Elegiaco - First Movement (for fans of Shostakovich and Stravinsky)




Tarantos




La Spiral Eterna (The Eternal Spiral) - Excellent interpretation, pretty bad audio though.




Acerca del cielo, el aire y la sonrisa




Takemitsu - Folios I, II, and III




All in Twilight - It's difficult to find a good recording of a performance for "All in Twilight" on youtube, but this piece was commission by Julian Bream in the 80's, so you might like it since Takemitsu drew influence from the warmth of Breams tone and a Paul Klee painting with the same title.




I can't recommend Takemitsu enough thanks to quarterbonez. Think of his solo guitar music like a walk through a musical garden which has neither a beginning or an end.


Heitor Villa-Lobos - Etude XII. Most people are already familiar with his Preludes, which are excellent. I like the first one the best, though "Prelude No. 4" is probably his most well known piece for solo guitar. This one almost sounds like rock/metal guitar on a classical. I'm pretty sure Lobos would have enjoyed death metal guitar.




Villa-Lobos - Etude XI




Astor Piazzolla - Four Pieces. There's a much better quality of this in the video at the bottom of my post.




For a jaw-dropping performance, watch Yamashita play some of Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition" on guitar.




Some guitar albums to check out.



This CD has the best recording for Takemitsu's solo guitar pieces imo. The natural reverb in the Lanna Church in Sweden where this was recorded is eargasmic. Might be a bit much for some, but I absolutely love it.




I'm going to keep recommending this until someone likes it, haha. Rare collection of avant-garde pieces by not so well known composers. Well, excluding Maurice Ohana.




Collection of all the Brouwer Etudes and other Latin American pieces he either composed or arranged.

Also, anyone with the slightest remote interest in classical guitar music should watch this: http://video.klru.tv/video/1607167133/. The best performances are at around 20:00 with Ana Vidovic and the GFA winner at the end who plays a fantastic Brouwer Sonata.

And for you Stravinsky fans, here's some insight to what "The Rite of Spring" is about and how it was composed: http://video.pbs.org/video/1295282238/
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Old 01-09-2011, 05:42 PM   #12
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i strongly suggest Alban Berg and Anton Webern. they were schoenberg's two most important pupils.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtMAz70lFX8
"violin concerto" - Berg.

really beautiful and remarkable piece that freely mixes 12-tone techniques with traditional tonality.

"wozzeck" - Berg
really dark and difficult modern opera that sounds fuckin metal.

as for Webern, he wrote a lot of very short pieces (like 30 seconds long sometimes), so you can get his complete works, conducted by Pierre Boulez, in one box set. you can easily get this set via ILL.

i also suggest "bluebeard's castle" by Bela Bartok, "vox balaenae (voice of the whale)" by george crumb and "ballet mecanique" by George Antheil. just a few really good 20th century pieces that popped into my head.
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Old 01-09-2011, 05:48 PM   #13
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Quote:
how about prettier music? nothing has topped the emotional power of schumann for me. any suggestions?
You will like this. It's quite long (5 parts), but be sure to go through it or let it be, the best parts lose their impact if you just skip through it.





Quote:
Originally Posted by Acatalepsy View Post
I've been listening to a lot a medieval music lately:


Gesualdo is nice. I like Palestrina, I think it's incredible how "modern" his music sounds at times even if it is 500 years old.



My definite favourite is Bach though, I have the Teldec 2000 complete edition, which features excellent recordings on 157 cds and still am working through it.

The thing that got me into Bach where the concerto recordings of Trevor Pinnock (harpsichord & conductor) with the English Concert:



I just love how Bach "slays", there's never stagnation in his music (in most pieces at least), and just when you think it can't get any further he ups the ante once again.

Solo piano/organ/harspsichord is my favourite music besides chamber music and Concerto Grosso.

I love Glenn Goulds recordings of the Well-Tempered Clavier (Though his others not so much, especially those on the harpsichord, you clearly can hear that he is a piano player, not a harpsichordist, even if you'd think a super-pro like him would be able to play both)
Unfortunately they are practically non-existent on the tube, it's Sony after all.

Here is an old recording of Wanda Landowska playing my one of my favourite preludes from WTC instead. She pretty much started the whole historically informed practice (and baroque music being en vogue again):



Other than that I love Scott Ross, his recording of the Goldberg Variations is my favourite:



He is more know because of his complete recording of the 555 Scarlatti Sonatas which is still the reference and through which I'm still listening. (Most Scarlatti sucks, but there are some real gems imo)



This chick has insane chops:





Ton Koopman is another favourite of me, he did most of the recordings in the Bach Teldec 2000 edition.

Look how he plays the famous Menuet in G the proper way:



And of course Gustav Leonhardt:

most metal cadence ever:


My favourite ensemble is Il Giardino Armonico:

Check out this astonishing and unique rendering of Vivaldis Winter (esp. 2 sec. mvmt):

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Old 01-09-2011, 06:02 PM   #14
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the other day i thought about starting a classical thread to discuss this kind of music but if this is the caliber discussion, no thank you. you guys arent doing anything to help classicals reputation
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Old 01-10-2011, 12:31 AM   #15
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whats the rock thing haha? i decided to start it anyway hoping for a pretension free convo and i got it. man there are a lot of things to look into here, thanks a lot chaapy et al for all the stuff to listen to, im going to start looking in my library and Rhapsody right now to listen to this stuff. i appreciate it!

the chopin piece you posted i have heard before i am almost positive, fantastic
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Old 01-10-2011, 12:42 AM   #16
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I'm going to keep recommending this until someone likes it, haha.
I am still trying to find this one. You wouldn't happen to have a link of it do you?
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Old 01-10-2011, 12:48 AM   #17
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oh and yamashita playing pictures is INSANE. i remember watching that a while ago. unbelievable.
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Old 01-10-2011, 06:52 AM   #18
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Have been meaning to start this kinda thread for a while...

Busy with my elective on weekdays now, so will come back and rape this thread over the weekend. Looking forward to suckling the glorious teet of chaapy's fine musical taste in this genre...always manages to recc something I dig, Monder being the last one I recall. Fantastic.
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Old 01-10-2011, 07:55 AM   #19
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Great thread! I've been meaning to explore some classical music myself, and this thread gave me the kick in the ass I needed


hilarious tag too
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Old 01-10-2011, 08:01 AM   #20
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I was going to make a lot of suggestions, but I narrowed it down to one.

Vladimir Ashkenazy plays Rachmaninoff Preludes, featuring Op. 32 - Prelude #2 in B flat minor.
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Old 01-10-2011, 09:21 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NaitsabesWinklersson View Post
Gesualdo is nice. I like Palestrina, I think it's incredible how "modern" his music sounds at times even if it is 500 years old.
Definitely. Have you seen the Herzog doc about him?
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Old 01-10-2011, 11:42 AM   #22
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I am still trying to find this one. You wouldn't happen to have a link of it do you?
No, I own it. I ordered my copy from amazon before they discontinued it and Germany was the only place in world at the time that carried it. I do know that someone uploaded it to what.cd but they labeled it wrong. Search "Leo Brouwer" and it should be under "modern guitar" as opposed to "Rara". I'm not going to upload it for anyone, I just can't do that my favorite living composer... Anyway, I want to post more accessible music tonight if I have time. Been getting into a lot of early romantic guitar lately. Also going to have to check out some of the stuff in this thread that I haven't heard.
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Old 01-10-2011, 01:14 PM   #23
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Johann Kaspar Mertz - Sort of an overlooked Hungarian guitarist and composer during Sor and Giuliani's time. He wrote some beautiful romantic guitar music.


"Romanze"




"Tarantella" - This is a character piece for guitar. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarantella. In short, the character gets bit by a spider and has to dance the poison out. He/she then begins to hallucinate from the poison and falls into a trance, reminiscing over the more beautiful things in life before being awoken, dancing until death. This story is told through the music, with each modulation or sequence representing a part of the story. The intro is obviously the spider crawling and biting the character, then they begin to "dance it out" violently, etc. Pretty cool.




I recommend you pick this CD up if you dig his music.




Béla Bartók - Another Hungarian pianist/composer, and arguably the best from his country. His string quartets are some of my favorite and he's really just an all around badass. He's so goddamn smart and I think his "Concerto for Orchestra", which is one of his most accessible pieces, is my favorite piece of 20th century music right next to "The Rite of Spring". You guys know how a Concerto is generally a really difficult piece for a solo instrument accompanied by an orchestra? Well, Bartók wrote a concerto for the entire orchestra! The fourth movement has one of the most beautiful melodies I've ever heard in my entire life (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ba...tra_(clip).ogg) - 1:05 in the fourth video at the bottom has the full section. I mean, wow... That tears me apart every time I hear it. In between that melody, which isn't included in that clip, he quotes a Shostakovich march in his 7th Symphony and has the brass section laugh at him. You can't miss it. Bartók wrote this piece when he left his country and moved to America due to pressures from the government. But Shostakovich didn't. He stayed in communist Russia and I think that section is Bartók's way of saying, "You don't have to stay there and write in that nationalistic style, you can come here and write the music you want, beautiful music like this."

If you're going to listen to this piece, you have to sit down and here the whole thing from beginning to end. The experience is unreal.












I'd recommend this recording of it.



For the string quartets.




Also have to mention the second movement in Beehtoven's 7th Symphony.



The amount of emotion felt in that is ridiculous. I mean, what the fuck? That's too much for me sometimes. Some might recognize that was used during the final sequence in "Irreversible".


Edit: I like whole-tone scale "abuse."


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Old 01-10-2011, 03:39 PM   #24
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beginner indeed
this is like listing john williams' soundtracks
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Old 01-10-2011, 04:23 PM   #25
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Looking forward to suckling the glorious teet of chaapy's fine musical taste in this genre...always manages to recc something I dig, Monder being the last one I recall. Fantastic.
Pretty sure I was the first one to post about Ben Monder on this board, but Chappy was probably repping him harder.
He's definitely worth being mentioned in this thread, though.
He may be a jazz guitarist, but I have a feeling that his writing has definitely a more classical feel to it, especially since he's influenced by such composers as Alfred Schnittke and Morton Feldman.

Quote:
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And for you Stravinsky fans, here's some insight to what "The Rite of Spring" is about and how it was composed: http://video.pbs.org/video/1295282238/
That's pretty cool, thanks. Any idea which recording is being played throughout the video? Sounds much more powerful than the one I got.
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Old 01-10-2011, 06:22 PM   #26
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That's pretty cool, thanks. Any idea which recording is being played throughout the video? Sounds much more powerful than the one I got.
I'm guessing it's this one since that's the San Francisco Symphony playing it.




Last thing to add because I can't believe I forgot it. Two really good interpretations imo.




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Old 01-12-2011, 07:49 PM   #27
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Definitely. Have you seen the Herzog doc about him?
Watched it earlier today. It was ok. I didn't like that there was so much made up acting and stuff (The part with the "opera singer" and the retarded kid wtf). And some elaborations on his actual style of writing other than how it is unusual and predicts the romantic era wouldn't have hurt.

Because I was already in the mood then, I watched a BBC documentation about Bach, it was pretty good, guess I'll watch others from this series (Great Composers) too:



8 parts. There is also a guy named Christoph Wolff in this whose biography of Bach I've read, apparently it's the best one out there, it features theoretical explanations with scores too, which I liked.
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Old 01-13-2011, 12:09 AM   #28
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anyone ever read a book about schumann? it seems like he would have an interesting life story- one that would make a great story more on an personal level. i know ive mentioned him in like every post i made, but i think a book or a documentary on him would be interesting on a personal level as well
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Old 01-13-2011, 05:00 AM   #29
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I know he was an idiot and hated himself. He made some stupid "training" contraption that fucked up one of his hand so that he couldn't play anymore...
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Old 01-13-2011, 10:06 AM   #30
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exactly, wacky stuff like that. i believe it was a finger and tendon stretching device for his hand that went awry permanently. he also had mental problems like alcoholism and possibly schizophrenia- he heard voices and in one booklet i read that he changed the pitch of his latter music because higher frequencies really perturbed him (!)

he also went to friedrich wieck for music training and admired friedrich's 9 year old talented pianist daughter. years later, clara wieck would become his wife but not before friedrich tried to block him through a judge by saying that schumann was a drunk
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